The Burial of the Dead (at Vergina) or 
The Unending Controversy on the Identity of the Occupants of Tomb II

 

In 1977 Manolis Andronikos made the spectacular discovery of Tomb II in the Great Tumulus at Vergina in Macedonia. Andronikos identified the occupants of that tomb as Philip II, King of Macedonia (359-336 B.C.) and father of Alexander III, and perhaps his last wife, Kleopatra. Ever since a controversy has raged about Andronikos’ identification.

In this article, Miltiades Hatzopoulos reviews the various alternate identifications and the evidence for them, and comes to the conclusion that Andronikos was correct.

It is worthy of note that none of the scholars cited by Hatzopoulos ever suggested that the occupants of the tomb were not Greek. Indeed, this monument of ancient Greek Macedonia has become a standard entry in the handbooks of Greek archaeology and architecture.

 

Click here to view the article in pdf format: The Burial of the Dead (at Vergina) or The Unending Controversy on the Identity of the Occupants of Tomb II

 

This article is hosted on the periodical tekmeria.org